Friday, August 2, 2013

There Once Was A Writer . . .



Edgar Dean Mitchell is an American pilot, retired Captain in the United States Navy and NASA astronaut. As the lunar module pilot of Apollo 14, he spent nine hours working on the lunar surface in the Fra Mauro Highlands region, making him the sixth person to walk on the Moon.

Mitchell is remembered for saying, "In outer space you develop an instant global consciousness, a people orientation, an intense dissatisfaction with the state of the world, and a compulsion to do something about it. From out there on the moon, international politics look so petty. You want to grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles out and say, 'Look at that, you son of a bitch.'"

Mitchell has publicly expressed his opinions that he is "90 percent sure that many of the thousands of unidentified flying objects, or UFOs, recorded since the 1940s, belong to visitors from other planets"

Of course, Mitchell's interests also include consciousness and paranormal phenomena. Buzz Aldrin once described a psychic communication experiment that Mitchell conducted during the Apollo 14 flight, wherein Mitchell attempted to transmit information to an observer on the ground. Aldrin stated that the experiment was a complete failure.

While browsing through some of my earlier journal jottings I happened upon a line I had written back in January of 2010. I thought, Did I really write that? And I answered myself by affirming, Sure I did. I could still write meaningful memoranda at that time.

Revised just a bit, I wrote:

Weeds of religion and other superstitions flourish in the untilled soil of barren minds.
--Gene Chambers

That aphorism can be found toward the end of a journal entry listing some of my early published work.

Note: In modern usage an aphorism is generally understood to be a concise statement containing a subjective truth or observation cleverly and pithily written.


Mosquito repellents don't repel. They hide you. The spray blocks the mosquito's sensors so they don't know you're there.



On this day, August 2 in 1876 James Butler, known as "Wild Bill" Hickok, one of the greatest gunfighters of the American West, was murdered in Deadwood, South Dakota.

Hickok was only 39 years old when he died. The most famous gunfighter in the history of the West died with his Smith & Wesson revolver in his holster, never having seen his murderer. According to legend, Hickok held a pair of black aces and black eights when he died, a combination that has since been known as the Dead Man's Hand.



epitome [ih-pit-uh-mee]
1. -  a person or thing that is typical of or possesses to a high degree the features of a whole class: He is the epitome of goodness.
2. -  a condensed account, especially of a literary work; abstract.
embodiment, exemplification, model, quintessence.



(Aug. 2, 1924 - June 21, 2001)
Carroll O'Connor was an American actor, producer and director whose television career spanned four decades. O'Connor first attracted attention as Major General Colt in the 1970 movie Kelly's Heroes. The following year he found fame as the bigoted working man Archie Bunker, the main character in the 1970s CBS television sitcoms All in the Family (1971 to 1979) and Archie Bunker's Place (1979 to 1983).

O'Connor later starred in the NBC/CBS television crime drama In the Heat of the Night from 1988 to 1995, where he played the role of southern Police Chief William (Bill) Gillespie. At the end of his career in the late 1990s, he played the father of Jamie Buchman (Helen Hunt) on Mad About You.

(born August 2, 1964)
Mary-Louise Parker is an American actress, best known for her lead role on Showtime's television series Weeds portraying Nancy Botwin. Parker has appeared in films and series such as RED, RED 2, Fried Green Tomatoes, Boys on the Side, The West Wing, and Angels in America,

(born August 2, 1945)
Joanna Cassidy is an American film and television actress. She is known for her role as the replicant Zhora in Ridley Scott's film Blade Runner (1982). Cassidy also has starred in films such as Under Fire, The Fourth Protocol, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, The Package, Where the Heart Is and Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead, Vampire in Brooklyn and Ghosts of Mars. From 2001 to 2005, she played Margaret Chenowith on the HBO drama series Six Feet Under. From 2011 to 2013, she played Joan Hunt on the ABC series Body of Proof.

(born August 2, 1979)
Donna Air is an English television presenter and actress. She started her career age 10 on the hit BBC series CBBC Byker Grove, just over 20 years ago. She has also acted in many television dramas, most recently Hollyoaks and Hotel Babylon, BBC TV comedy Operation Good Guys, Catherine Cooksons six parter A Dinner of Herbs, and Lynda La Plante's Supply and Demand. Air appeared in the films Still Crazy (1998), The Mummy Returns, and Bad Day amongst others.


In a revolution, as in a novel, the most difficult part to invent is the end.
--Alexis de Tocqueville



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